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Tim Powers Criminal Law

Denton, Lewisville, Flower Mound and Corinth DWI and Criminal Attorney


Blood-Alcohol Content Calculator*

A person's blood-alcohol level is the result of a interaction of weight, gender, alcohol consumed and time.

Weight (pounds)

Drinks Consumed  
(12 ounces beer or equivalent)

Over Time Period  
(In hours)

Gender        



Blood Alcohol Content
(B.A.C):

*The basic formula for estimating blood-alcohol concentration comes from the NHTSA - the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Each drink in this calculation assumes a volume of of .54 ounces of alcohol (1 shot of distilled spirits, a glass of wine, or 12 ounces of beer).

How many drinks does it take?
Calculate your blood-alcohol level

Many of us have wondered just how many drinks it takes before we'd be considered legally intoxicated.

In many states, you're intoxicated if you have a blood-alcohol level of 0.10 percent. Many states - such as Texas - have moved to a lower level of 0.08.

If you get pulled over and your blood-alcohol level is above the legal limit, you'll be arrested for intoxicated driving. If that leads to a conviction, you'll will get socked with much higher insurance premiums - if you get your license back at all.

This calculator will give you some examples of what your blood-alcohol content could be if you drank a specific number of drinks over a certain time period. Remember, this is just an approximation - the calculator has to make certain assumptions, such as drinking the alcohol on an empty stomach. If you eat while you drink, the alcohol is absorbed more slowly into your bloodstream.

Alcohol effects everyone differently. Of course, if you don't normally drink, a single beer could make you unsafe to drive. A good rule of thumb is: By the time you start feeling intoxicated, you're well past the legal limit.

In general, the more you weigh, the more you'd have to drink to be considered intoxicated. Consider this: A 220 pound male could drink five beers in an hour and still not be legally intoxicated in many states. His blood-alcohol content would be 0.0758. If a 140-pound man drank the same amount, his blood-alcohol content would be 0.1260 - well over the legal limit.

Gender also effects your blood-alcohol content. The female counterpart to a 140-pound intoxicateden male would have a blood-alcohol content of 0.17097 after consuming six drinks in an hour.

The slower you drink, the more time your body has to metabolize the alcohol. Each hour you add takes 0.012 off your blood-alcohol content, according to the formula used by this calculator.


The above information is not intended to disseminate legal advice or include all situations or facts specific to your case. Certain factors (including, but not limited to aggravating circumstances or prior criminal record used for enhancement) may alter the punishment range for the crime for which the defendant is actually charged. For further information which applies your facts to the law contact our office for a FREE CONSULTATION at 940.483.8000 or metro 972.724.4820.


Criminal defense attorney Tim Powers graduated cum laude from Tulane University School of Law in New Orleans. He is a former Assistant District Attorney and Chief Misdemeanor Prosecutor, Powers was voted 1997 Denton County Prosecutor of the Year.

Tim has experience in over 5,000 DWI, drug, assault/family violence, divorce and family law cases in North Texas. He recently served as a Municipal Court Judge in Denton County. He is a member of the College of the State Bar of Texas, the Texas Criminal Defense Lawyer's Association, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers and the Denton County Bar Association.

Tim Powers is an experienced legal analyst and commentator for various media outlets including the Associated Press and has been seen in national mediums including: USA Today, Newsday, ABC News Online, MSNBC.com, The Dallas Morning News, Fort Worth Star Telegram, and Denton Record-Chronicle, among others.

He frequently appears on FOX 4 News, NBC 5, CBS 11, and WB33. Tim has extensive radio experience. He is a regular guest on shows across the nation including America @ Night, The Jeff Katz Show, The Popoff Report, The Flipside and many more. Locally, he serves as an analyst for WBAP, KRLD, the Texas State Network, KLIF, News Talk 990, KLLI's The Russ Martin Show and the Marty Griffin Show.

Visit the News Room

Our office is located at:
121 North Woodrow Lane
Suite 201
Denton, Texas 76205
(we are located just east of the Denton County Courthouse)

940.483.8000
972.724.4820 (Metro)
940.483.8300 (Fax)
Email: Info@TimPowers.com
Click here for directions to our office.


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© 2005 — 2014 Law Offices of Tim Powers | Principal Office — Denton, Texas | Attorney responsible for the content of advertising is: Timothy E. Powers | Our attorneys have years of criminal law experience. We utilize that experience in attempt to get the best result possible in your case. | This Website is considered an ADVERTISEMENT according to the Rules of Professional Conduct of the State Bar of Texas. | Disclaimer | Licensed by the Supreme Court of Texas. | The Law Offices of Tim Powers located next the Denton County Courthouse, serves clients throughout Texas, including Plano, Denton, Lewisville, Flower Mound, Carrollton, Corinth, Lake Dallas, Hickory Creek, Trophy Club, Keller, Aubrey, Pilot Point, Ponder, Krum, Little Elm, The Colony, Westlake, Roanoke, Highland Village, Dallas, Denton County, Dallas County, Tarrant County, and Collin County